Posts Tagged "vertigo"

The Causes of Vertigo

Posted by on Jun 12, 2014 in brain, Tips | 0 comments

The Causes of Vertigo

In the dictionaries, they say that vertigo is the slightly dizzy feeling that you get when you are positioned at great heights like on top of a building. You will feel vertigo when you look down from there. However, that definition does not encompass its medical meaning. The feeling of giddiness that we feel during the said situation is very well normal. Having vertigo has its causes and it needs certain treatments and tests too.   The Medical Definition of Vertigo True enough, vertigo is a kind of dizziness which means that you get a feeling that you are moving or spinning even though you are not. But what’s important is that you do not confuse it with the word acrophobia. Vertigo is definitely not the fear of heights. Although they can be associated, vertigo can never be directly associated with acrophobia as the former has its medical causes.   Vertigo is Caused By 1)      Disturbance in the balance organs of the inner ear. This is also known as the peripheral vertigo. You see, the ear has tiny organs that allow ‘messages’ to reach the brain as a reaction to gravity. When this happens, you are able to maintain your balance because the brain has been informed of the movement from the vertical position. When this system is disturbed, there will be inflammation that can lead to vertigo. 2)      Disturbance in the parts of the brain or sensory nerve pathways. This, on the other hand, is known as the central vertigo. This term has been collected to refer to the disturbance to the parts of the brain that is involved in the interaction between senses of vision and balance. It is that or there is a disturbance in the sensory messages to and from the thalamus part of the brain. When you have migraine headache, this can usually lead to vertigo as well.   Determining If You Have It Unlike other medical conditions, there is only one symptom that will help you determine that you have vertigo.  It’s as simple as having the feeling of giddiness that makes you feel like you or your environment is spinning. However, the number of symptoms that you may experience will vary on how you got the condition. You may experience nausea, hearing loss, tinnitus, vomiting or a feeling of fullness in the ear. There is also nystagmus, a classic eye movement sign of vertigo which is being tested by doctors....

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Understanding Vertigo

Posted by on Dec 13, 2013 in Tips | 0 comments

Understanding Vertigo

There is about 20 to 30% of the population affected by Vertigo.  This is a type of dizziness where the patient feels like he or the environment is spinning around. Nausea, vomiting and balance issues are often associated with Vertigo and there are about 3 types of this condition. The first type is called objective because the patient feels that the objects around him or her are moving. The second is subjective where the patient feels like he or she is spinning. The last type of Vertigo is called pseudo vertigo where the sensation of spinning is inside the patient’s head. Vertigo may be present in any age and studies show that the prevalence increases with age. Vertigo has many different causes and proper diagnosis is required because symptoms may often be mistaken for something else. The most common causes of vertigo are Meniere’s disease, migraines, head injury, alcoholic intoxication, multiple sclerosis, acoustic neuroma, brain tumor and medication. Medical attention is immediately needed if your vertigo episode comes with headache or coordination problems. If it also lasts more than a couple of days, it is best to see a doctor. Vertigo may last for a few hours to a few days but it is possible to have symptoms that will become persistent. To best realize whether your vertigo requires more medical attention, simply get checked. The doctor will ask you a series of questions and check to categorize your vertigo as peripheral or central. Peripheral vertigo is common and can be diagnosed by moving the head and checking whether dizziness will occur at certain positions and will disappear when the head goes back to neutral position. Central, on the other hand, is a more serious issue that often results from a problem in the brain stem or cerebellum. Checking the eye will also show whether the problem is peripheral or central. Treatment of vertigo depends on the severity and duration of the symptoms. Usually, bed rest can do a lot of help to relieve the patient of the spinning sensation. Other times, a doctor will prescribe medication like meclizine or tranquilizer. Those who suffer benign paroxysmal positional vertigo may have to undergo therapy in a clinic where the head and the body will be moved through a series of positions. The doctor may also some teach you some method of body positioning that you can do at home. If you have a more persistent type of vertigo, you may have to undergo balance rehabilitation. A series of movements will be done depending on what the doctor sees as the causes of your dizziness are. In this case, physical therapy will be recommended. Vertigo may often be brushed aside because many people see it as not very risky. However, it may be a symptom for a more serious condition so it is important to get diagnosed properly especially if your symptoms persist. You might benefit from Vestibular Rehabilitation Training (VRT) that can be performed by a therapist. Visit RockPhysicalTherapy to see what options you have to treat your...

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