Tips

Causes of Knee Pain

Posted by on Sep 19, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Causes of Knee Pain

There are many different types of pain, and while all are annoying or even debilitating, they are usually the sign of a larger problem. Especially in the parts of your body that you rely on the most for mobility, like your knees, a constant pain could mean something serious that needs to be treated as soon as possible to make sure that you aren’t affecting your ability to walk permanently.   Where does it hurt?   The first step toward deciding what knee pain could mean, is determining where exactly on the knee your pain is the most intense. The knee is usually divided in a simple, logical way: the front (kneecap), the inside, the outside (usually referring to the lateral sides of your knee), and the back of the knee.   It’s also important to note whether there is any swelling and when your knee hurts the most.  Knee pain that is usually present in the morning, but fades throughout the day could be a sign of early arthritis, while pain that is present during certain activities is usually indicative of injury.   Some common causes   Pain inside the knee is usually the result of MCL injuries. Persistent pain on the back of the knee usually means the formation of a “Baker’s cyst”.  Tendonitis, or the swelling of the tendons is the most common cause of pain on the sides of the knee, and pain in the front usually means a problem with your kneecap such as a partial dislocation.   Almost all of these sites of pain can also be a sign of more serious injury or the beginning of arthritis. If you have been experiencing consistent knee pain, seek the help of a medical professional such as a doctor or physical therapist as soon as...

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Orthopedic Physical Therapy

Posted by on Aug 27, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Orthopedic Physical Therapy

Orthopedic means anything having to do with the muscles in your body and your skeleton. Orthopedic physical therapy is any physical therapy specially designed to treat disorders that affect these systems. If you are suffering pain or swelling in your muscles or joints, visiting a physical therapist can help to diagnose what is specifically bothering you and work out a treatment plan developed just for you. Some of the common causes of orthopedic problems are arthritis, fibromyalgia, recovering from surgery, and injury. Physical therapists will sometimes use sonograms to aide in the diagnosis and of these painful conditions. Once a therapist has determined what is causing your pain and discomfort will work with you to develop a program of specific exercises, massages, and other therapeutic techniques to help restore your mobility and flexibility. Whether you have been through an operation as traumatic as an amputation, or are recovering from a small bone fracture, physical therapists help you to regain your strength and retrain your muscles to start working with your new condition. They also might use a combination of massage or hydrotherapy to both relieve your stress, aiding your both physically and psychologically to get back to your previous...

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Getting The Most out of your Joint replacement

Posted by on Aug 16, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Getting The Most out of your Joint replacement

Orthopedic surgeons will sometimes choose to replace part, or all of a joint that has been damaged. Hips, shoulders, and knees are the most common sources of pain and loss of mobility that doctors will attempt to fix. But, having this surgery is not enough. Joint replacement procedures become more and more common every year, but the difficulty of adjusting to a new joint remains a long, involved process. Working with a dedicated physical therapist is the best way to learn how to successfully get the most mobility out of your new joint. What Physical Therapy Offers Physical therapy programs include resistance exercises and stretching to help your adjustment after a difficult procedure. In addition, weight training and treadmill exercises will help get your strength back allowing you to get the most out of your replacement. A Specific Program for You The pain after a joint replacement can keep you from doing the things you love or keep you awake at night. A physical therapy program tailored to you and your specific circumstances, whether it was a knee, hip, or shoulder replacement, will help get you back on track and ease the pain. Licensed physical therapists are ready to develop the right program for you, helping you to get back to living your life and stop worrying about the difficulties of joint...

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Fibromyalgia Physical Therapy

Posted by on Aug 12, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Fibromyalgia Physical Therapy

Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder that affects muscles and bones. It can also have a negative impact on mood, memory, and sleep cycles. Currently there is no cure for fibromyalgia, but people suffering from these issues can turn to physical therapy to look for relief of their symptoms.  How Can Physical Therapy Help? Physical therapists always work with you to help improve your posture, mobility, and flexibility. Since Fibromyalgia affects muscles and bones, working on these specific traits with a licensed professional can help you to improve your body and lessen the pain that you might feel on a daily basis. A physical therapist will develop strategic exercises and stretches that are catered to you and your body. Improving your overall fitness level, flexibility, and working your joints regularly to gain new ranges of motions will not only help you to overcome pain, but allow you to return to activities that Fibromyalgia might otherwise prevent you from doing. In combination with massage and hydrotherapy, working through these physical issues will also improve your circulation and stress. When your body is strengthened and a physical therapist has helped you to learn to relax, the psychological effects of a painful disorder like Fibromyalgia will also decrease. If you are suffering from Fibromyalgia, there is no reason to let the disease control your life. Trained physical therapists are ready to give you back your strength and peace of mind....

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Understanding a Herniated Disc

Posted by on Aug 9, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Understanding a Herniated Disc

Your spine is made up of vertebrae that stack on top of each other. In between these vertebrae are disks that serve as the buffer, keeping one bone from rubbing up against another. Sometimes, these disks can “slip” and stick out through the vertebrae, irritating surrounding nerves. Age, obesity, low levels of physical activity, and continuous strain such as at a job often cause this. Recognizing the Symptoms A herniated disk most often leads to pain and sometimes, even numbness in the leg. A herniated disk may sound like a very serious problem, but for most people surgery is unnecessary and physical therapy proves the best solution. If you have experienced this pain or numbness in the leg, a physical therapist can evaluate you to determine if you have a herniated disk. Special tests along with measurements of your posture and range of motion will usually show that a herniated disk is at fault. But, if you are experiencing extreme pain, muscle weakness, or loss of sensation, something more serious could be at fault and an MRI may be necessary. How Physical Therapy Can Help Licensed physical therapists will guide you through a specific exercise regimen that will relieve the pressure placed on the nerves surrounding the disk, give as long-lasting good habits such as posture improvement, and specialized pain relief treatments to help you through the current pain. Targeted strength and aerobic exercises will build muscle in specific areas, such as the arms and legs, to take pressure off the spine when working. In combination with stretches that will also aide to improve flexibility and motion throughout the...

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Stroke Signs You Should Get Familiar With

Posted by on Aug 1, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Stroke Signs You Should Get Familiar With

Strokes are the result of what happens when a blood vessel carrying oxygen and nutrients stops flowing to a certain part of the brain due to a clot (an ischemic stroke) or rupturing (a hemorrhagic stroke). They are sometimes referred to as “brain attacks.” When blood flow is stopped for longer than a few seconds, the brain does not get enough blood and oxygen, which allows brain cells to die, causing permanent damage. It is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. If stroke symptoms are seen or noticed, it is imperative that you call 911 as soon as possible, as these symptoms need to be acted on immediately. According to the American Stroke Association, the acronym, F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of stroke. F: Face Drooping– Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven? A: Arm Weakness– Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? S: Speech Difficulty-Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like “The sky is blue.” Is the sentence repeated correctly? T: Time to call 911: If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared. Other stroke symptoms include: Sudden numbness or weakness of the leg, arm or face Sudden confusion or trouble understanding Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Sudden severe headache with no known cause Though some risk stroke risk factors cannot be changed or can only be controlled (age, high blood pressure, etc.), you can lower the risk of having a stroke by improving your lifestyle. You can do this by quitting smoking, treating diabetes, having a balanced diet, being...

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