brain

The Causes of Vertigo

Posted by on Jun 12, 2014 in brain, Tips | 0 comments

The Causes of Vertigo

In the dictionaries, they say that vertigo is the slightly dizzy feeling that you get when you are positioned at great heights like on top of a building. You will feel vertigo when you look down from there. However, that definition does not encompass its medical meaning. The feeling of giddiness that we feel during the said situation is very well normal. Having vertigo has its causes and it needs certain treatments and tests too.   The Medical Definition of Vertigo True enough, vertigo is a kind of dizziness which means that you get a feeling that you are moving or spinning even though you are not. But what’s important is that you do not confuse it with the word acrophobia. Vertigo is definitely not the fear of heights. Although they can be associated, vertigo can never be directly associated with acrophobia as the former has its medical causes.   Vertigo is Caused By 1)      Disturbance in the balance organs of the inner ear. This is also known as the peripheral vertigo. You see, the ear has tiny organs that allow ‘messages’ to reach the brain as a reaction to gravity. When this happens, you are able to maintain your balance because the brain has been informed of the movement from the vertical position. When this system is disturbed, there will be inflammation that can lead to vertigo. 2)      Disturbance in the parts of the brain or sensory nerve pathways. This, on the other hand, is known as the central vertigo. This term has been collected to refer to the disturbance to the parts of the brain that is involved in the interaction between senses of vision and balance. It is that or there is a disturbance in the sensory messages to and from the thalamus part of the brain. When you have migraine headache, this can usually lead to vertigo as well.   Determining If You Have It Unlike other medical conditions, there is only one symptom that will help you determine that you have vertigo.  It’s as simple as having the feeling of giddiness that makes you feel like you or your environment is spinning. However, the number of symptoms that you may experience will vary on how you got the condition. You may experience nausea, hearing loss, tinnitus, vomiting or a feeling of fullness in the ear. There is also nystagmus, a classic eye movement sign of vertigo which is being tested by doctors....

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What Are Neurological Disorders

Posted by on May 26, 2014 in brain | 0 comments

Neurological disorders pertain to the diseases and conditions which affect the nervous systems. These diseases cause disparity in the functioning of the brain and affect the way of life of a person with a certain disorder. Although these disorders have not been uncommon, it has affected millions of people and has taken away a huge part of their lives. Some of these disorders include Epilepsy, Alzheimer, Parkinson’s disease, brain tumor and many others affecting the nerves in the brain causing malfunction in the brain and body’s activity. Causes of Neurological Disorder There are many causes of a neurological disorder, some are hereditary, in-born, others are because of malnutrition and some are developed as the person ages depending on the lifestyle they have including the environment they are living in. Having said that, lifestyle does play a big role in a person’s brain activity that causes these disorders. A person’s lifestyle has a great effect in their body and brain condition, the food they eat, the energy they put into the things they do, how they keep themselves healthy and the place they are in are some factors which triggers disorders of the brain. One may think what they eat and what they do does not affect their brain activity and functions, are wrong. A certain addiction to vices including drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes can also be a factor leading to a neurological disorder, also, lack of exercise and poor nutrition helps in the development of these disorders; excessiveness of unhealthy food and drink can also be a reason for a certain disorder. Also, neurological disorder can be acquired during birth; not only it can be hereditary but can also be an effect of the environment of the mother. The most common are the Chromosomal Abnormalities occurring in the fertilization. Some of these abnormalities include Down syndrome and Edward’s syndrome. Keeping a Healthy Lifestyle Because most of these disorders are due to the poor lifestyle of a person, one must be aware and must be cautious of their daily lifestyle and food intake. Although some neurological disorders cannot be prevented, there are still other diseases that you can avoid. A good and healthy diet can help in the decrease of the amount of fat that clogs the arteries causing brain attacks, being aware of the food you eat and what good or bad it does to your body can help you avoid diseases, a healthy diet which includes vegetables and fruits are good for everyone, thus, keeping the body and brain healthy. Also, keeping a regular exercise is important as it clears the arteries and helps in maintaining the muscles of your heart well. A regular check up with your doctor and therapy is highly recommended, consultations in starting a diet plan and exercise must also be done in order to find out which diet and exercise are fit with your age, body and condition. These preventions are only the basic but keeping a healthy lifestyle and being aware of our body condition is important especially in dealing with the...

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Dealing With Multiple Sclerosis

Posted by on Apr 25, 2014 in brain, Tips | 0 comments

Multiple sclerosis is a complicated disease that has symptoms that affect different parts of the body depending on which part of the brain is affected. The symptoms often include visual problems, changes in sensation, chronic pain, muscle spasms and depression. This disease can affect a person who is as young as 20 years of age. The cause is unknown up to this day but it is believed to come from both genetic and environmental factors. It is a difficult thing to deal with when you’re diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and many of those affected do not know where to start managing the disease. It can be scary but being diagnosed with MS does not mean you have to give up on everything. Many people have been successful in managing symptoms. Here are a few things to remember: Actively control the situation at an early stage Although it may take a lot of time accepting the condition and reassuring your self and your loved ones that everything will be alright, it is important that you are able to take control early by considering the right treatment for you. Hands on physical therapy has helped a lot of MS patients in dealing with the symptoms to help them get back to living normal with the ability to perform daily tasks. You might want to consider what therapy you can get that is covered by your insurance provider. If you live in Maryland, you can check physical therapy clinics around you to make the treatment as convenient as possible. Accept what you feel No matter what you feel about being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, it is important that you accept and acknowledge how you feel. Whether you are angry, sad, afraid or ashamed, you have to understand that those are normal feelings to have with this condition. Over time, your feelings will change but it will only change if you have stopped blaming yourself and those around you of what happened or what caused you to get this disease. Talk to your loved ones about your condition They may be as afraid as you or even more afraid because they may think how badly you are affected. It would help a great deal if you talk to them and let them know how you feel as well as asking them about how they feel so that you will have a support system that is openly accepting how you feel and how they feel about you. Constantly check with your doctor As with any other disease, making sure that you are in control of your disease is done by maintaining regular checks with your doctor so you are aware of how the disease is advancing. The doctor can also help you in managing the pain you will experience by giving you prescription for medicine. Don’t forget to take care of yourself Live an active life. Don’t give up on your dreams. Take care of yourself completely. Continue living and do not lose the hope that you will also be successful in managing your multiple...

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Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease

Posted by on Feb 26, 2014 in brain, Tips | 0 comments

Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease

Research shows that people who have Parkinson’s disease can benefit from regular exercise. Stiffness is minimized with regular exercise. It also improves a person’s ability to move, posture, and balance. Ideal exercises for individuals with Parkinson’s disease Routines that challenge the lungs and heart and those that promote good posture and biomechanics are ideal for people with Parkinson’s. Stiffness can also be reduced through dancing. It is important for exercise routines to be varied considering that people with the disease often find it hard to shift from one position to the other. Other beneficial exercises are those that promote normal and symmetric movements. Walking in the mall, yoga, aerobics, hiking with the use of walking sticks, and swimming are all good exercises for people with Parkinson’s. Best time to exercise The ideal time to exercise is when mobility level is at its best. Those who are taking medications have the best mobility an hour after taking medications. Then again, it varies from one person to the other. People do not react to medications the same way. Thus, it is important to observe beforehand the patient’s reaction to medications to identify the best time for him or her to exercise. When to approach a physical therapist After a person is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, he or she should consult a physical therapist. The physical therapist performs an assessment and creates and exercise program appropriate for the person. This also allows the physical therapist to have a baseline of the patient’s physical status. Although patients may already have a good exercise program prepared by the physical therapist during the initial consultation, a visit to the physical therapist is necessary when the person identifies signs and symptoms that can increase his or her risks of falling. It is also important to see a physical therapist when the person is no longer comfortable moving around. The therapist can also help the person improve gait by practicing auditory and visual cues. Need for regular re-evaluations The diseases progresses in time, which is why a patient with Parkinson’s disease should have regular re-evaluations. This is to ensure that the person is still benefitting from the exercise program. A program that focuses on improving posture, gait, and balance has to be individualized to decrease any risk of falling. There are also some instances when a patient will require treatments in a facility a couple of times every week. Importance of learning-based routines Learning-based routines can also help patients with Parkinson’s. It helps them enhance their multi-tasking abilities without falling and sustaining injuries. It promotes better health and well-being despite the presence of a neurodegenerative disease. A lot of people have Parkinson’s disease. Although this disease slowly progresses, it should not stop patients from living normal lives and doing what they want. Exercise and physical therapy can make life better for these individuals. Patients with Parkinson’s disease in Montgomery Village and Olney only need to be proactive in visiting their therapists and performing their exercises so they can see a significant difference in their daily...

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Brain Attack: The Dangers of Stroke

Posted by on Dec 6, 2013 in brain, stroke, Tips | 0 comments

Brain Attack: The Dangers of Stroke

Due to a rapid loss of air supply in the brain, a stroke happens, which affects brain functions drastically. There are several effects of stroke that include inability to see on one eye, inability to move limbs and inability to speak coherently. These functions are lost because of the lack of oxygen in the brain that causes the loss of nutrients, which then results to brain damage. Because it can cause permanent neurological damage or even death, a stroke, as a medical emergency, needs immediate attention. In Maryland, the prevalence of stroke is higher for those aged over 65 for at least two times higher than those aged 55 to 64. Unfortunately, a stroke can actually happen to anyone at any age. A study showed that stroke is the third leading cause of death in MD. With this alarming truth, Maryland residents have to understand this disease and find ways to prevent it. Types of Stroke There are 2 main types of stroke. One is the ischemic stroke, which is a stroke that results from a blockage like a clot in the blood vessel. The other is called hemorrhagic stroke that occurs a vessel bursts or when there is bleeding between the area of the brain and the skull. The good news is that a good percentage of people who suffer from stroke make great recovery within a month. However, it is important to realize that stroke victims may have long-term problems such as slurred speech or inability to move one part of the body. It could take months or even years to recover, if they ever will. A stroke may have different effects on different people because the damage depends on what part of the brain is affected. Someone who has suffered a stroke may lose some bodily functions and learning abilities. A stroke could also result in being unable to process thoughts and communicate. For some, therapy is a great deal of help to get some functions back to normal. If you think someone near you is suffering from a stroke, do a quick test and seek for medical attention immediately. To lessen the damage to the victim, you have to act FAST. Check for Facial weakness. If the person is unable to smile or is feeling some numbness in one part of the face, a stroke may be happening or may have already happened. Check for Arm weakness. Ask the person to raise both arms. If he or she cannot do so, he or she is at risk of stroke. Check Speech ability. To check this, ask the person to say a complete sentence. If he or she cannot coherently create one, his or her speech ability may already be starting to get affected. Time to call for help. These steps should be done very quickly and if you see that one or two of the signs of stroke are present, immediately call 911. The faster you act, the better the chances of lessening the brain damage happening to the...

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