Posts by rockphysicaltherapy

Getting The Most out of your Joint replacement

Posted by on Aug 16, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Getting The Most out of your Joint replacement

Orthopedic surgeons will sometimes choose to replace part, or all of a joint that has been damaged. Hips, shoulders, and knees are the most common sources of pain and loss of mobility that doctors will attempt to fix. But, having this surgery is not enough. Joint replacement procedures become more and more common every year, but the difficulty of adjusting to a new joint remains a long, involved process. Working with a dedicated physical therapist is the best way to learn how to successfully get the most mobility out of your new joint. What Physical Therapy Offers Physical therapy programs include resistance exercises and stretching to help your adjustment after a difficult procedure. In addition, weight training and treadmill exercises will help get your strength back allowing you to get the most out of your replacement. A Specific Program for You The pain after a joint replacement can keep you from doing the things you love or keep you awake at night. A physical therapy program tailored to you and your specific circumstances, whether it was a knee, hip, or shoulder replacement, will help get you back on track and ease the pain. Licensed physical therapists are ready to develop the right program for you, helping you to get back to living your life and stop worrying about the difficulties of joint...

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Understanding a Herniated Disc

Posted by on Aug 9, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Understanding a Herniated Disc

Your spine is made up of vertebrae that stack on top of each other. In between these vertebrae are disks that serve as the buffer, keeping one bone from rubbing up against another. Sometimes, these disks can “slip” and stick out through the vertebrae, irritating surrounding nerves. Age, obesity, low levels of physical activity, and continuous strain such as at a job often cause this. Recognizing the Symptoms A herniated disk most often leads to pain and sometimes, even numbness in the leg. A herniated disk may sound like a very serious problem, but for most people surgery is unnecessary and physical therapy proves the best solution. If you have experienced this pain or numbness in the leg, a physical therapist can evaluate you to determine if you have a herniated disk. Special tests along with measurements of your posture and range of motion will usually show that a herniated disk is at fault. But, if you are experiencing extreme pain, muscle weakness, or loss of sensation, something more serious could be at fault and an MRI may be necessary. How Physical Therapy Can Help Licensed physical therapists will guide you through a specific exercise regimen that will relieve the pressure placed on the nerves surrounding the disk, give as long-lasting good habits such as posture improvement, and specialized pain relief treatments to help you through the current pain. Targeted strength and aerobic exercises will build muscle in specific areas, such as the arms and legs, to take pressure off the spine when working. In combination with stretches that will also aide to improve flexibility and motion throughout the...

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Stroke Signs You Should Get Familiar With

Posted by on Aug 1, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Stroke Signs You Should Get Familiar With

Strokes are the result of what happens when a blood vessel carrying oxygen and nutrients stops flowing to a certain part of the brain due to a clot (an ischemic stroke) or rupturing (a hemorrhagic stroke). They are sometimes referred to as “brain attacks.” When blood flow is stopped for longer than a few seconds, the brain does not get enough blood and oxygen, which allows brain cells to die, causing permanent damage. It is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. If stroke symptoms are seen or noticed, it is imperative that you call 911 as soon as possible, as these symptoms need to be acted on immediately. According to the American Stroke Association, the acronym, F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of stroke. F: Face Drooping– Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven? A: Arm Weakness– Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? S: Speech Difficulty-Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like “The sky is blue.” Is the sentence repeated correctly? T: Time to call 911: If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared. Other stroke symptoms include: Sudden numbness or weakness of the leg, arm or face Sudden confusion or trouble understanding Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination Sudden severe headache with no known cause Though some risk stroke risk factors cannot be changed or can only be controlled (age, high blood pressure, etc.), you can lower the risk of having a stroke by improving your lifestyle. You can do this by quitting smoking, treating diabetes, having a balanced diet, being...

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Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease

Posted by on Feb 26, 2014 in brain, Tips | 0 comments

Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease

Research shows that people who have Parkinson’s disease can benefit from regular exercise. Stiffness is minimized with regular exercise. It also improves a person’s ability to move, posture, and balance. Ideal exercises for individuals with Parkinson’s disease Routines that challenge the lungs and heart and those that promote good posture and biomechanics are ideal for people with Parkinson’s. Stiffness can also be reduced through dancing. It is important for exercise routines to be varied considering that people with the disease often find it hard to shift from one position to the other. Other beneficial exercises are those that promote normal and symmetric movements. Walking in the mall, yoga, aerobics, hiking with the use of walking sticks, and swimming are all good exercises for people with Parkinson’s. Best time to exercise The ideal time to exercise is when mobility level is at its best. Those who are taking medications have the best mobility an hour after taking medications. Then again, it varies from one person to the other. People do not react to medications the same way. Thus, it is important to observe beforehand the patient’s reaction to medications to identify the best time for him or her to exercise. When to approach a physical therapist After a person is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, he or she should consult a physical therapist. The physical therapist performs an assessment and creates and exercise program appropriate for the person. This also allows the physical therapist to have a baseline of the patient’s physical status. Although patients may already have a good exercise program prepared by the physical therapist during the initial consultation, a visit to the physical therapist is necessary when the person identifies signs and symptoms that can increase his or her risks of falling. It is also important to see a physical therapist when the person is no longer comfortable moving around. The therapist can also help the person improve gait by practicing auditory and visual cues. Need for regular re-evaluations The diseases progresses in time, which is why a patient with Parkinson’s disease should have regular re-evaluations. This is to ensure that the person is still benefitting from the exercise program. A program that focuses on improving posture, gait, and balance has to be individualized to decrease any risk of falling. There are also some instances when a patient will require treatments in a facility a couple of times every week. Importance of learning-based routines Learning-based routines can also help patients with Parkinson’s. It helps them enhance their multi-tasking abilities without falling and sustaining injuries. It promotes better health and well-being despite the presence of a neurodegenerative disease. A lot of people have Parkinson’s disease. Although this disease slowly progresses, it should not stop patients from living normal lives and doing what they want. Exercise and physical therapy can make life better for these individuals. Patients with Parkinson’s disease in Montgomery Village and Olney only need to be proactive in visiting their therapists and performing their exercises so they can see a significant difference in their daily...

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How to Prevent Osteoporosis

Posted by on Feb 19, 2014 in Back, Tips | 0 comments

How to Prevent Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis affects millions of people all over the world. Bone thinning starts by the time a person reaches the age of 30. It is a natural process and there is no way to stop it completely. The chance of developing osteoporosis does not only depend on how thick or thin the bone is, but also on several other factors such as health and diet. By eating the right food and exercising regularly, you may avoid or delay osteoporosis. Have a nutritious diet You need to have a nutritious diet that has enough vitamin D and calcium. These two play essential roles in keeping the bones healthy and strong. Vitamin D helps bones absorb calcium, thereby increasing muscle strength. Vitamin D also reduces the odds of having a fracture. You can get vitamin D from sun exposure as well as from milk and supplements. Exercise regularly Exercise improves bone mass and decreases fracture risks. It also helps women in maintaining bone density even after menopause. Since you can develop muscle strength from exercising regularly, you also reduce the chances of falls due to weakness. Exercising three times a week for at least half an hour is a good way to prevent osteoporosis. Stop smoking Smoking is never good for your health. Smoking hastens the process of bone loss, which means that you can have osteoporosis early on. Drink moderately If you cannot help but drink, be sure to put a limit to the number of drinks you have per day. Women can have 1 alcoholic drink per day while men can have 2 drinks per day. Be extra careful and prevent falls Falling increases risks of developing fractures. Implement fall prevention measures such as removing loose items like rugs and electrical cords that can cause slipping and falling. There should also be adequate lighting all over the house and most especially in staircases and entrance ways. Do not walk on surfaces that are slippery and try not to walk on surfaces that are not familiar to you. Use medications only with the advice of a physician There are some medications that when taken for a long period of time can promote bone loss. It is important to have your physician monitor your use of these medications so you can decrease or even discontinue your intake when possible. Glucocorticoids, heparin, and some antiepileptic drugs can increase bone loss. In the event that these methods are not enough to prevent osteoporosis, the best thing you can do is deal with the condition. It does not have to ruin your life. There are a lot of osteoporosis treatments available and you simply need to make a move. Never ignore the problem as it can affect your daily living. One way to deal with the pain and mobility problems caused by osteoporosis is to see a physical therapist. Patients in Montgomery and Olney who have osteoporosis need to understand that rehabilitation is an essential part in managing the condition and that rehabilitation should involve getting help of an excellent physical...

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