Posts made in November, 2014

Staying Healthy Through the Holidays

Posted by on Nov 22, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Staying Healthy Through the Holidays

Physical therapy isn’t all about stretches and exercises. It’s also about living a more healthy and productive lifestyle overall. The holidays are upon us and with them come all the joy of seeing family and friends, but there are also fattening foods, cold weather, and seasonal illnesses like the flu. Getting the most out of the holiday season and working to maintain your health is easy by following some simple guidelines.   The first thing to do is prepare for travel. Between the different celebrations, you will no doubt be spending some time away from home. Be sure to work with your therapist to develop and master simple stretches and exercises that can be done while you’re away. This will help to make sure that your first visit when back home isn’t too strenuous.   Another important thing to remember is to watch out for germs. This time of year cold and flu virus germs are rampant. Be sure to carry hand sanitizer with you while you’re shopping or out and about to protect yourself. There’s no need to go under quarantine, but keeping an extra eye out for potential areas where you might get sick could save you a lot of time and hassle in the end.   Between those big holiday dinners find time to practice some basic exercises, even as simple as walking. With the cold weather outside, it can be easy to let this slip, but finding even a little bit of time to spend on the treadmill everyday could help make a major difference and let you enjoy indulging in delicious holiday treats all the more.   Lastly, the holidays can be a stressful time between family obligations, searching for presents, and cooking. Take time for yourself, perhaps by even getting a massage to make sure that you are ready to have the best time possible. If you work with a physical therapist on mobility issues, be sure to discuss with them any added stresses like big meals or playing with kids that are sure to be coming your way soon and how to best prepare for...

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Physical and Occupational Therapy

Posted by on Nov 18, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

Physical and Occupational Therapy

Physical therapy gets discussed a lot for anyone that has a chronic physical condition, is in need of surgery, or lives with pain. But, the term occupational therapy comes up regularly in the same conversations. Both of these types of therapists, physical therapists and occupational therapists are working toward the same general goal: helping people. There a lot of ways in which these two professionals use the same techniques and methods to achieve this goal, and many in which they differ. If you’ve wondered exactly what the difference is between these two types of therapy, now is the time to clear up the confusion.     Physical Therapy   A physical therapist is a specialist in movement of the human body, their primary concern is a patient’s ability to move properly, and so they focus on pain reduction, function, preventing long-term disability. They will often work with patients to help them prevent losing movement or to regain as much mobility as possible after a traumatic incident like surgery or an accident.   Physical therapists are most concerned with the structures of the body like ligaments, joints, and tissues. They can diagnose dysfunctions that are affecting movement and then use their knowledge of exercises, and specialty equipment like ultra sound machines, to lessen pain. They attack a person’s disorder and problem physically.     Occupational Therapy   Occupational therapists will work with people who are facing many of the same issues, and often times they might employ some of the same techniques of pain relief and exercises to help people deal with pain and gain back mobility, but their primary concern is addressing the way people will now function in their daily life.   Both at home and at work, an OT will perform on-site assessments and make recommendations to help a patient adapt to their environment with new restrictions or impairments. While the physical therapist is primarily concerned with relief from a condition, the occupational therapist shows patients how to get the best quality of life while living with a condition.       Both of these professions are aimed at patients’ suffering from pain and physical limitations and giving them back their independence and relief. A physical therapist is qualified to make recommendations about adapting a lifestyle to better suit new restrictions just like an occupational therapist can treat pain, but with the combination of their specific expertise, people can both achieve their best physical potential and learn how to best live with any restrictions that can’t be...

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What Is a Neurological Disorder?

Posted by on Nov 11, 2014 in Tips | 0 comments

What Is a Neurological Disorder?

Out of the many problems and disorders that physical therapists help patients overcome, some of the most serious and complicated can be neurological disorders. According to the World Health Organization, a neurological disorder is a disease that affects the central and peripheral nervous system, meaning the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, and muscles. Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, dementia, strokes, migraines, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and head traumas can all be classified under this umbrella of varied disorders. These conditions all stem from physical problems with the brain or associated structures of the body, and they should not be confused with psychiatric illnesses.   A mental illness  affects a person’s thoughts and behavior. Of course, certain neurological issues, like Alzheimer’s, might also change a patient’s personality or perception, but unlike these diseases, a mental illness will not have a physical component that a doctor can point to on a scan and say that it is the cause.   Hundreds of millions of people around the world suffer from neurological disorders. Strokes claim the lives of approximately 6.2 million people, more than 50 million people suffer from epilepsy, and it is estimated that 35.6 million people deal with dementia, the majority of those cases being brought on by Alzheimer’s.   Some of the main signs to look for that might indicate a neurological issue includes sudden problems with memory and concentration, blackouts, slurred speech, and the loss of use of a limb. If you or a loved one have been experiencing these issues, they could be the sign of a larger problem that requires the intervention of a neurosurgeon or neurological physical...

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Injury Prevention

Posted by on Nov 8, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Injury Prevention

Most people seek the help of a physical therapist in the aftermath of a problem. Surgeries, injuries, or chronic pain is the signal that it’s time to get help, but often times these situations can be avoided.   Just like maintenance on a car, getting help first can prevent bad situations from arising. Physical therapists can work with you to figure out what injuries or conditions you might be predisposed for, and develop ways to help you avoid the pain before it ever starts.   Athletes in particular should seek the advice of a physical therapist. The immense amount of physical activity that they put their bodies through means they are at a higher risk for joint and muscle injuries.   A physical therapist can work with you to strengthen the muscles that will protect your weak points—such as the ACL ligament, a common source of problems for serious athletes. They will also make sure that you have sufficient training and strength to endure the amount of use certain muscle groups and joints will endure for your sport.   It’s not just for athletes though, anyone who feels that they might be at risk for a physical injury, whether for their job or beginning a new exercise regimen, can work directly with a therapist to make a plan. Sometimes a consultation and some simple stretches, exercises, and knowledge is enough to save you the expense and difficulty of major...

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